Scholarship

To truly realize the Kinder Institute’s overall goal of promoting greater understanding of the philosophical foundations and historical origins of the United States, and also of the lasting, global relevance of these ideas and events, we have a number of programs in place to continue the research and professional development of scholars on the Mizzou campus and in our community.

As the sections below indicate, these programs range in audience, nature, and scope, from international conferences for leading scholars in the fields of political thought and history, to continuing education opportunities for Missouri high school teachers, to fellowships to support the career advancement of the next generation of professors.

Postdoctoral Fellowships

To advance the careers of recently-minted Ph.D.s in History, Political Science, and Government, the Kinder Institute sponsors a number of postdoctoral fellows each year in Political History and Political Thought & Constitutionalism. The postdoctoral fellowships are one-year appointments, typically with the possibility of renewal for a second year, and provide recipients with office space at the Kinder Institute, a vibrant intellectual community with which to share research, and the opportunity to teach and develop undergraduate courses for the Institute’s new B.A. in Constitutional Democracy, as well as for MU’s B.A. programs in History and Political Science.

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Faculty Research & Travel Grants

As a way to advance scholarship on American political thought and history, the Kinder Institute sponsors a program of research and travel grants for members of the MU academic community whose work focuses on the philosophical foundations and historical origins of the nation’s constitutional and democratic traditions, as well as the evolution, application, and reinterpretation of these traditions in later periods and around the globe.

The Fall 2019 deadline to apply for research and travel grant funding from the Kinder Institute has passed. Spring 2020 applications will open at the beginning of February.

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Academic Workshops

One of the Kinder Institute’s primary goals is to create a vibrant intellectual community on the MU campus dedicated to producing and discussing innovative scholarship on the complicated history of constitutional democracy in the U.S. and abroad. To advance this goal, we have created a number of opportunities, in addition to our regular series of colloquia, for scholars on campus, in the region, and around the globe to share current research with one another.

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Studies in Constitutional Democracy Book Series

Studies in Constitutional Democracy, the Kinder Institute’s interdisciplinary monograph series with University of Missouri Press, officially launched in April 2016 with the publication of MU Professors James Endersby and Bill Horner’s co-authored Lloyd Gaines and the Fight to End Segregation, the first manuscript to devote itself entirely to exploring the historical and political significance of Missouri ex rel. Gaines v. Canada (1938), an integral, though often overlooked, landmark in civil rights history. Since then, the Institute and Press have continued to put out at least two books per year on topics that plumb the foundations, origins, evolution, and application of constitutional democracy in the U.S. and around the globe, from before the American Revolution into the 21st century.

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Missouri Summer Teachers Academy

In Summer 2016, in partnership with the Missouri Humanities Council, the Kinder Institute launched the Missouri Summer Teachers Academy, a residential conference that provides high school social studies teachers from around the state with an opportunity to gain new content knowledge in their field by studying alongside Mizzou faculty.

The conference is organized around a new theme in political history each year, and thanks to the generosity of the Humanities Council, teachers’ participation in it is fully subsidized.

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