Directory

More than anything, the Kinder Institute is a vibrant, diverse community of scholars who share not only an academic interest in rigorously unpacking the complex history of constitutional democracy in the U.S. and around the globe but also a commitment to collective inquiry. Both in the classroom and beyond it, our undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty learn both alongside and from one another, and they do so with the kind of civility and interdisciplinary curiosity that is essential to generating innovative scholarship and engaging in productive discourse.

Use the tabs below to meet the people who make up the Kinder Institute.

Karlee Adler

Karlee Adler

Undergraduate Fellows, Kinder Scholars,

Karlee Adler is a Sophomore from Springfield, MO, pursuing a degree in History. In Fall 2018, she acted as Peer Learning Assistant for the Kinder Institute’s Constitutional Democracy Freshman Interest Group, and she will serve during AY 2019-20 as the inaugural R.A. for the Kinder Institute Residential College. She is also a member of the MU Honors College and a participant in the Washington Society and interned during Spring 2019 at the Missouri Supreme Court to learn about public history.

Alan Atterbury

Alan Atterbury

Advisory Board,

Alan L. Atterbury received his B.A. in Economics from the University of Missouri and his J.D. from the University of Missouri School of Law. He served as an active-duty Army officer, after which he acted as Attorney Advisor to Federal Power Commission Vice-Chairman Pinkroy C. Walker, former Dean of the MU School of Business and practiced law as a partner at Morrison & Hecker (now Stinson, Leonard, Street). Mr. Atterbury was co-founder and founding CEO of Midland Loan Services (MLS), a national real estate financial services company based in Overland Park, KS. MLS, now owned by PNC Financial Services, is currently the nation’s second-largest commercial real estate loan servicer with approximately $400 billion of loans under management. Mr. Atterbury continues to be active in Midland Properties, Inc., a local investment management company. He has served as a board member at the Harry S. Truman Library Institute, the Midwest Research Institute, and the Kansas City Missouri Police Foundation, and as chair of the UMKC Trustees and UMKC Foundation boards. He is married to Mary Pearson Atterbury, a graduate of the MU School of Education, and they have three children: Jennifer, Andrew, and David.

Heather Ba

Heather Ba

Affiliated Faculty,

Heather Ba is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Missouri, as well as the Research Coordinator for the White House Transition Project (http://whitehousetransitionproject.org). She completed her Ph.D. at UNC-Chapel Hill, and her research interests include international political economy, U.S. foreign policy, and the American presidency. Specifically, her scholarship examines the linkages between international relations theory and the conduct of U.S. foreign policy, U.S. foreign policy crisis management, and the role of presidential advisory systems in U.S. foreign policy decision making. Additionally, through her work with the White House Transition Project, she studies presidential transitions, the politics of executive appointments, and presidential behavior during foreign policy crises.

Robert G. Bailey

Robert G. Bailey

Affiliated Faculty,

Bob Bailey is a 1968 graduate of Marist College and a 1979 graduate of the University of Missouri -Columbia School of Law, where he commenced his career after graduation. In 1983, Prof. Bailey became the City of Columbia’s Municipal Judge, serving for four years before returning to the MU Law School full time in 1987 as the Assistant Dean and Senior Fellow. Prof. Bailey is also Vice President of the National Academy of Arbitrators and has an active labor and sports arbitration practice. In addition, he is a Commissioner for the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniformed State Laws (NCCUSL), and he serves on the Uniform Athlete Agent Act and the Veterans Court Act drafting committees. Prof. Bailey is actively involved in campus committee work and chairs the mid-month Institutional Review Board (IRB), and he has a long history of community services. Presently, he chairs Boone County Family Resources, an agency providing services to 1,300 developmentally disabled citizens, and in the past, he has chaired the Family Health Center, the Central Missouri Food Bank, and the Regional Aids Inter-Faith Network (RAIN). He served as Director of the Law School’s nationally renowned Center for Dispute Resolution from 2005-2013, and he teaches Arbitration, a Lawyering Seminar, a first-year Lawyering class, and a Freshman Interest Group (FIG). Prof. Bailey is married to Sharon, and they have two daughters and four grandchildren.

Jenelle Beavers

Jenelle Beavers

Advisory Board,

In 2018, Jenelle Beavers joined the UM System Office of the General Counsel after serving as the Associate Director of MU’s Honors College. Before moving back to Missouri, she spent eight years as a trial attorney with the United States Department of Justice. In 2011, she earned a special commendation from the Assistant Attorney General for Outstanding Service for her work on behalf of U.S. taxpayers. From 2005-2008, she was a litigation associate in the Washington D.C. office of Latham & Watkins, where she represented individuals, non-profit and for-profit entities, and other institutional clients in white-collar and governmental investigations and civil litigation. She also served on the firm’s global hiring committee. Originally from Kansas City, MO, Ms. Beavers holds a B.A. in English from the University of Missouri and credits her professional success to her undergraduate curricular and extracurricular experiences at MU. She earned her J.D. and M.P.H. from the University of Michigan where she was an editor of the Michigan Law Review. Ms. Beavers also currently serves on the Missouri Supreme Court’s Commission on Racial and Ethnic Fairness.

William Bloss

William Bloss

Undergraduate Fellows,

William Bloss is a senior honors student originally from Aurora, Missouri, majoring in History and Political Science with a minor in Geography. He is the vice president of Mizzou’s Undergraduate History Society and secretary of the Pi Sigma Alpha Political Science Honors Society, as well as a member of the Geography Club and Jefferson Book Club. In the summer of 2019, William will serve as a congressional intern for Representative William ‘Billy’ Long of Missouri’s seventh district in Washington, D.C., through the Civic Leaders Internship Program (CLIP). After receiving his bachelor’s degrees in History and Political Science, William plans to continue his research in Atlantic Studies with a Ph.D. in History.

J.D. Bowers

J.D. Bowers

Affiliated Faculty,

J.D. Bowers is the Director of the Honors College and a scholar of genocide studies. He earned his undergraduate degree in government at The College of William & Mary and an M.A. and Ph.D. in history at Indiana University. Professor Bowers’ research focuses on post-genocide justice and societal reconciliation, which he approaches from an interdisciplinary lens. He is currently completing a book project on the last sixty years of the Cyprus conflict, a situation that has festered due to the lack of reconciliation or justice, as well as working on a project about the role of the international courts in the pursuit of international justice. Professor Bowers regularly teaches courses on genocide, public affairs, and history, and also offers a wide variety of Honors courses, including “Barbecue: Cuts, Culture, and Consumption.” He also has a special interest in teaching abroad and routinely takes students to The Netherlands, Cyprus, and Turkey.

Lane Burdette

Lane Burdette

Undergraduate Fellows,

Raised in Ozark, Missouri, Lane Burdette is a senior honors student at MU, majoring in Psychology and International Studies. On-campus, she is a mentor for the Chancellor’s Leadership Class, a Research Assistant in the MU Alcohol Cognitions Laboratory, a former Deaton Scholar, and a former executive board member of both The Maneater and the MU Women’s Leadership Conference. Off-campus, Lane is an exhibited photographer and volunteers regularly with The Missouri Crisis Line and City of Refuge. She spent the Fall 2018 semester abroad in Valparaíso, Chile, and is always looking for opportunities to practice her Spanish. After graduation, Lane hopes to pursue graduate study in political psychology. She joins the Kinder Institute as one of two inaugural affiliated undergraduate fellows.

Aaron Carter

Aaron Carter

Kinder Scholars,

Raised in Iowa City, Aaron Carter is an MU Junior, majoring in Political Science and Journalism, with a minor in Business. Aaron represents the School of Journalism in student government as an MSA Senator and has previously worked for student and professional journalism organizations. Following his undergraduate studies, Aaron is considering attending law school and is interested in either practicing law or working in the intelligence community with the U.S. government.

Lawrence Celani

Lawrence Celani

Graduate Fellows,

Goodrich Fellow, State Historical Society of Missouri, Kinder Institute Graduate Research Affiliate
Lawrence Celani received his B.A. in History and Philosophy from the University of Rhode Island, and his M.A. in American History from Providence College. He is interested in the politics of slavery and freedom in the Missouri and Illinois borderland region in the early republic, and his dissertation examines the political and legal regimes on both sides of the river, and the process by which this region moved from a unified one, connected by a shared colonial heritage and institutions, to one divided along sectional lines by the Civil War. He argues that this process was accelerated during the period between 1818 and 1824 that saw a series of national and regional crises that enhanced the political, social, and economic divisions that arose in the antebellum period in these states. In addition to his research, Lawrence is working with the Missouri Humanities Council on a traveling exhibit that will commemorate the bicentennial of Missouri’s statehood and the local and national crises that surrounded it.

Madeline Clarke

Madeline Clarke

Kinder Scholars,

Madeline Clarke is a senior honors student from Ashland, Missouri, majoring in History, Political Science, and Geography, and pursuing a Certificate in American Constitutional Democracy. She is an undergraduate fellow at the Kinder Institute, president of the Geography Club, a member of Jefferson Book Club, and an undergraduate research ambassador. After graduating from Mizzou, Madeline plans to attend graduate school to continue her research on the American presidency and pursue a career in academia.

Christian Cmehil-Warn

Christian Cmehil-Warn

Kinder Scholars,

Christian Cmehil-Warn is a Junior from Poplar Bluff, MO, majoring in Economics and Statistics, with minors in Math, Computer Science, and American Constitutional Democracy. He is a Show-Me Scholar and Honors College Ambassador, as well as founding co-chair of Kinder Ambassadors. Christian does research on campus with the Computer Science Department, with which he has traveled to conferences in Los Angeles and Prague to present his team’s work, and in the summer of 2018, he interned with the Management Performance Hub of the State of Indiana. Christian plans on attending graduate school for a Master’s in Public Policy after finishing at Mizzou, with the goal of studying how potential governance structures for machine learning and artificial intelligence can prevent further reinforcing systematic injustices.

Bryce Cole

Bryce Cole

Undergraduate Fellows,

Raised in the ever so beautiful town of Springfield, Missouri, Bryce Cole is a sophomore at the University of Missouri. He is majoring in Political Science and Philosophy and holds a passion for research regarding immigration, the criminal justice system, and healthcare. A member of the Jefferson Book Club, Bryce enjoys reading and engaging in conversation that challenges his previously held beliefs, and this summer, he will hold a criminal law internship with MRD lawyers in Springfield. After graduation, Bryce hopes to pursue a law degree to advance his dream of being a U.S. District Court judge.

Carli N. Conklin

Carli N. Conklin

Kinder Institute Faculty,

Kinder Institute Director of Undergraduate Studies and Associate Professor of Constitutional Democracy, Associate Professor of Law
Carli N. Conklin is an Associate Professor at the School of Law and Associate Professor of Constitutional Democracy at the Kinder Institute.

Professor Conklin’s research interests are in American legal and intellectual history. She completed her B.S. in English and M.A. in Education at Truman State University and studied law and history at the University of Virginia through a joint J.D./M.A. program in American legal history. She was awarded the School of Law’s Madeleine and John Traynor Prize for her Master’s thesis, which explored state court treatment of arbitration in early America. Professor Conklin served as Associate Professor of History and Co-Director of the Pre-Law Professional Program at John Brown University before returning to U.Va. to complete her Ph.D. in History. Her dissertation explored the meaning of the pursuit of happiness in historical context.

Professor Conklin’s research has been published by the American Journal of Legal History, the Ohio State University Journal on Dispute Resolution, the University of Missouri Journal of Dispute Resolution, and the Washington University Jurisprudence Review. Her recent book, The Pursuit of Happiness in the Founding Era:  An Intellectual History, was published through the Kinder Institute’s Studies in Constitutional Democracy monograph series with the University of Missouri Press.

Professor Conklin teaches courses in lawyering and dispute resolution at the School of Law and courses on intellectual history at the Kinder Institute. She serves as the Kinder Institute Director of Undergraduate Studies, coordinating, among other things, the Society of Fellows program and the Constitutionalism and Democracy Honors College course series.

Siobhan Conners

Siobhan Conners

Kinder Scholars,

Siobhan Conners is an MU junior from Plainfield, Illinois, majoring in Journalism, with an emphasis in Magazine Writing, and pursuing minors in Peace Studies and American Constitutional Democracy. She is the co-founder of Writeous Girls, a non-profit organization that empowers young women through writing, and on campus, she works at the MU Writing Center, and is a site leader for Mizzou Alternative Breaks, a contributing writer for Vox, and a member of Period and Mizzou for You. After graduation, she hopes to work in the magazine industry for a few years and then pursue a career in media law.

Maxx Cook

Maxx Cook

Undergraduate Fellows, Kinder Scholars,

Raised in Harrisonville, Missouri, Maxx Cook is a Junior in the MU Honors College, double-majoring in Economics and East Asia Studies, with a certificate in Geospatial Intelligence. His work at Orphan’s Hope World Mission has taken him to India, Myanmar, and China, and he interned during Summer 2018 at the Missouri Trade & Investment Office in Taiwan. Upon returning to campus, Maxx continued serving on Mizzou’s AEI Executive Council and as president of the Mizzou College Republicans. He is currently conducting research on the geoeconomic elements of US-Sino military relations, and after completing his undergraduate work, Maxx intends on pursuing a Master’s in International Affairs and a career in national security.

Ashley Dorf

Ashley Dorf

Undergraduate Fellows, Kinder Scholars,

Ashley Dorf is a Sophomore in the MU Honors College, majoring in Journalism, with an emphasis in Strategic Communication. She is involved in the Kinder Summit program, as well as the Resident Hall and Missouri Students Associations, and outside of schoolwork, she enjoys music, sports, and baking. After completing her undergraduate career at Mizzou, Ashley plans on attending law school or pursuing work in media studies.

Jay Dow

Jay Dow

Kinder Institute Faculty, Advisory Board,

Kinder Institute Faculty Fellow
Jay Dow is Professor of Political Science and 2017-2020 Frederick A. Middlebush Chair in Political Science. Before coming to the University of Missouri, he earned an undergraduate degree at the University of Oregon and a Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin. Professor Dow’s research focuses on voting and elections, which he approaches from the public choice tradition in political science, as reflected in his recent book, Electing the House: The Adoption and Performance of the Single-Member District Electoral System (University Press of Kansas, March 2017). Professor Dow regularly teaches courses on American government, parties and elections, and American political thought, as well as the “Constitutional Debates” course for the Kinder Institute’s Honors College series, and he also organizes the Jefferson Book Club, an extracurricular undergraduate reading group that meets monthly to discuss great books in the classical liberal tradition.

Zachary Dowdle

Zachary Dowdle

PostDoctoral Fellows,

Kinder Institute Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow in Political History
Zachary Dowdle earned his B.A. and M.A. in History from Angelo State University in San Angelo, Texas. His dissertation at the University of Missouri looks at shifting conceptions of race and gender in the political culture of nineteenth-century Missouri and the United States through an examination of the career of James Sidney Rollins, a slave owner who was a leading Whig politician and pro-Unionist. Rollins served as a representative at both the state and national levels, working to establish the University of Missouri in the 1830s and providing a crucial swing vote in Congress that approved the Thirteenth Amendment. Zachary has presented his work at conferences in Columbia, New Orleans, and San Diego, has received a travel grant from the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy, and was a Fellow at the JMC Summer Institute in Philadelphia. In his free time, he enjoys spending time outdoors, either cycling on country roads or hiking along local trails. Zachary will join the Kinder Institute as a 2017-18 Research Affiliate in History.

Cooper Drury

Cooper Drury

Affiliated Faculty,

Cooper Drury is Senior Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Science and Professor of Political Science and Truman School of Public Affairs at the University of Missouri. He earned his BA and MA from Michigan State University (1990, 1992) and his PhD from Arizona State University (1997). His primary research and teaching interests focus on foreign policy. Specifically, he studies the causes, outcomes, and consequences of economic sanctions. Professor Drury has authored or co-authored two books, a textbook, and over two dozen articles and chapters and served as editor-in-chief of Foreign Policy Analysis. A committed teacher, Professor Drury has trained more than twenty doctoral students and has been awarded multiple teaching and mentorship awards.

Justin B. Dyer

Justin B. Dyer

Kinder Institute Faculty,

Director of the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy, Professor of Political Science
Justin Dyer is a professor of political science and director of the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy. He completed his M.A. and Ph.D. in Government at the University of Texas at Austin. His research and teaching interests span the fields of American political development, political philosophy, and constitutional law, with a particular interest in the perennial philosophy of natural law. His most recent book, co-authored with Greg Casey, is A Guide to the Missouri Constitution, published by W.W. Norton & Co. in February 2017. He is also the author, with Micah Watson, of C.S. Lewis on Politics and the Natural Law (2016); Slavery, Abortion, and the Politics of Constitutional Meaning (2013); and Natural Law and the Antislavery Constitutional Tradition (2012). He also recently co-edited the two-volume American Constitutional Law casebook, with Donald Kommers, Gary Jacobsohn, George Thomas, and John Finn. He regularly teaches undergraduate courses on political theory and the U.S. Constitution and graduate seminars on public law.

Josh Eagan

Josh Eagan

Kinder Scholars,

Washington, MO-native Josh Eagan is a Junior at Mizzou, majoring in Economics and Political Science and minoring in Math. On-campus, he is president of MU Students for Sensible Drug Policy; a member of the Deaton Scholars, through which he is at work on an initiative to improve the food security of refugees living in Columbia; and an economics tutor at the MU Learning Center. In addition, he worked last summer on a research project with the Political Science Department focusing on the opium economy in Afghanistan as a funding source for the Taliban. Josh’s academic interests span public health economics, black markets, and agricultural policy, and after graduation, he plans to apply to economics graduate programs and pursue a career as a policy analyst.

James Endersby

James Endersby

Affiliated Faculty,

James Endersby is Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Canadian Studies Program at the University of Missouri. He earned a Ph.D. in Government at the University of Texas at Austin and was a fellow at the Shorenstein Center on Press and Politics at Harvard University before coming to MU. His research and teaching interests include American and Canadian politics, with particular focus on voting and elections, interests groups, and the media and politics. He is co-author, with Bill Horner of the MU Political Science Department, of Lloyd Gaines and the Fight to End Segregation, a study of the landmark civil rights case Missouri ex rel. Gaines v. Canada that was the first book published as part of the Kinder Institute’s Studies in Constitutional Democracy monograph series with University of Missouri Press. He has received several awards including an Outstanding Graduate Faculty Award from the University of Missouri and the Governor General’s Medallion (Canada).

Keona K. Ervin

Keona K. Ervin

Affiliated Faculty,

St. Louis native Keona K. Ervin is Assistant Professor of African-American History at the University of Missouri-Columbia. A Center for Missouri Studies Faculty Fellow at the State Historical Society of Missouri, Ervin is the author of Gateway to Equality: Black Women and the Struggle for Economic Justice in St. Louis (University of Kentucky Press, 2017), and she has published articles in International Labor and Working-Class History, Journal of Civil and Human Rights, and Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society. She is a recipient of the Career Enhancement Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, the Arts and Sciences Faculty Fellowship from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and the Huggins-Quarles Dissertation Award from the Organization of American Historians.

Carl H. Esbeck

Carl H. Esbeck

Affiliated Faculty,

Carl H. Esbeck joined the faculty of the University of Missouri School of Law in 1981 and currently serves as the R.B. Price Professor emeritus and Isabelle Wade & Paul C. Lyda Professor of Law emeritus. He received his Juris Doctor magna cum laude in 1974 from Cornell University, where he was on the board of editors of the Cornell Law Review. Prof. Esbeck held a judicial clerkship with the Honorable Howard C. Bratton, chief judge of the U.S. District Court in New Mexico, and, from 1975-81, he practiced law in the Albuquerque firm of Rodey, Dickason, Sloan, Akin & Robb, where he was an equity partner when he left. Prof. Esbeck has published widely in the area of religious liberty and church-state relations, and he is recognized as the progenitor of “charitable choice,” an integral part of the 1996 Federal Welfare Reform Act, and later applied to all federal social-service grant programs via the faith-based initiative under Presidents Obama and Bush. In addition, he has taken the lead in recognizing that the modern U.S. Supreme Court has applied the Establishment Clause not as a personal right, but as a structural limit on the government’s authority in explicitly religious matters. While on leave from 1999 to 2002, Prof. Esbeck directed the Center for Law & Religious Freedom (CLRF) at the Christian Legal Society and then served as Senior Counsel to the Deputy Attorney General at the U.S. Department of Justice. While directing the CLRF, he was a central part of the congressional advocacy behind the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act of 2000 (RLUIPA). While at the Department of Justice, one of his duties was to direct a task force to remove barriers to the equal-treatment of faith-based organizations applying for social-service grants. Prof. Esbeck presently serves as Legal Counsel to the National Association of Evangelicals and on the Board of Directors of the Christian Legal Society. At MU, he teaches courses on Civil Procedure, Religions Liberty and Church-State Relations, Federal Civil Rights Litigation, and Constitutional Law.

Devin Fergus

Devin Fergus

Affiliated Faculty,

Devin Fergus is the Arvarh E. Strickland Distinguished Professor of History and Black Studies at University of Missouri. His research focuses on political economy, policy, and inequality in modern America. Professor Fergus is the author of Land of the Fee (Oxford, 2018), which explores the hidden costs of rising financial fees at home, school, work, and transportation on wealth and mobility in modern America. A much-anticipated work, Land of the Fee has been called one of the five best books for understanding capitalism today. His current research project examines white-collar crime and the racial wealth gap.

Fergus is guest editor of the special issue Banking without Borders: Culture and Credit in the New Financial World for Kalfou, a journal published by Temple University Press. This special issue examines the impact of four decades of financial deregulation in the U.S. on vulnerable populations, which has increasingly affected the middle class. He has written widely on policy, political economy, and inequality for the New York TimesWashington Post, and the Guardian. Along with Louis Hyman, Bethany Moreton, and Julia Ott, Professor Fergus is also editor of the Columbia Studies in the History of U.S. Capitalism book series published by Columbia University Press.

Professor Fergus has worked closely with several national policy organizations (e.g., Demos, Closing the Racial Wealth Gap Initiative, the Center for Global Policy Solutions, and Prosperity Now) and has presented research to a number of federal entities, including the U.S. Treasury, U.S. Department of Education, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the Special Master (Kenneth Feinberg) for TARP Executive Compensation. Professor Fergus received his Ph.D. in American history from Columbia University.

Brendon Floyd

Brendon Floyd

Graduate Fellows,

Haskell Monroe Graduate Fellow in Civil War Era History
Brendon Floyd holds a B.A. in History and an M.Ed. in Secondary Education from Johnson State College, as well as an M.A. in History from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. He is now a Ph.D. student in History at University of Missouri, working under Jay Sexton as the Haskell Monroe Graduate Fellow in Civil War Era History. His research interests lay in Irish and Irish-American radicalism and identity in the Early American Republic.

David Garcia

David Garcia

Undergraduate Fellows,

Raised in Liberty, Missouri, David Garcia is a sophomore in the MU Honors College, majoring in History. At Mizzou, he has taken an interest in helping his community through his involvement with the Residents Hall Association and his hall government. David is also a member of the pre-law fraternity, Phi Alpha Delta, and hopes to pursue a career in law after finishing at MU. David was part of Jay Sexton’s Spring 2019 “Global History Oxford” class, and during his free time, he enjoys running, eating with friends, and playing his violin.

Alan Gibson

Alan Gibson

Faculty Fellows,

2019-20 Kinder Institute Distinguished Visiting Research Fellow
Alan Gibson is Professor of Political Science at California State University, Chico. His focus is American political thought, especially that of the American founding. Gibson has held fellowships from the International Center for Jefferson Studies in Charlottesville, Virginia, the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He has published articles in, among other journals, American Political Thought, Polity, History of Political Thought, and The Review of Politics. Gibson is the author of two books on the historiography of the American founding, both published by University Press of Kansas, and he is currently working on a study of the political thought of James Madison, tentatively titled James Madison and the Creation of an Impartial Republic. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Notre Dame.

Ryan Giesing

Ryan Giesing

Undergraduate Fellows,

Born and raised in Eureka, Missouri, Ryan Giesing is a junior at the University of Missouri, studying Secondary Education, with the goal of teaching future generations of high school students about American Government and the U.S. Constitution. On campus, Ryan is an active member of the College of Education Student Council and Vice President of The Berean Way, a Christian student organization. In his free time, Ryan loves building furniture and watching Ken Burns documentaries. After graduation, he plans on earning a Master’s degree in education before going home to Eureka to pursue a teaching career in the Rockwood School District. After his time in the classroom, Ryan plans on returning to MU to complete his Ph.D. in Administration and Educational Policy, with the goal of becoming Superintendent of Rockwood Schools.

Lawrence Goldman

Lawrence Goldman

Faculty Fellows,

Kinder Institute Senior Fellow
Lawrence Goldman was born in London and graduated in History from the University of Cambridge (Jesus College). He studied American History at Yale as a Harkness Fellow and returned to Britain to do his doctoral work at Cambridge’s Trinity College, focusing on the history of social science in the Victorian period. He spent 29 years as a university lecturer at the University of Oxford where he was Fellow and Tutor in History at St. Peter’s College and where he taught modern British and American History. He was then Director of the Institute of Historical Research in the University of London. From 2004-2014 he was the Editor of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, a compendium of the most significant figures throughout British history and the longest work in the history of the English languageand he has authored books on Victorian social science, the history of workers’ education in Britain, and the life of political thinker and historian R.H. Tawney, among other topics. He most recently edited, Welfare and Social Policy in Britain Since 1870: Essays in Honour of Jose Harris. He is a Senior Research Fellow of St. Peter’s College and joins the Kinder Institute as a Senior Fellow in the new M.A. program in Atlantic History and Politics.

Aric Dale Gooch

Aric Dale Gooch

Graduate Fellows,

Graduate Teaching Assistant, Kinder Institute Residential College
Aric Dale Gooch earned his B.S. in Social Science Education and Political Science from Southwest Baptist University in Bolivar, Missouri, and is currently a Ph.D. student in Political Science at MU. His research is focused on the American early republic, specifically political party development, elections, and institutions, and his dissertation explores the development of nomination procedures of the Federalists and Democratic-Republicans as constituency focused and organized party structures in the first party era. In his free time, he likes to play board games, go hiking, and watch Parks and Rec. Aric will join the Kinder Institute as a 2019-2020 Graduate Teaching Assistant.

Stephen C.W. Graves

Stephen C.W. Graves

Affiliated Faculty,

Stephen C.W. Graves is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Black Studies at the University of Missouri. His research focuses on Black Politics and Theory, American Government, and Leadership Studies. Professor Graves is the author of A Crisis of Leadership (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016), which explores the concepts of the citizen, citizenship, and leadership in contemporary America and the lack of leadership in the African American community since 1970. He is the founder of Troublesome Movement, a non-profit organization that focuses on community outreach and providing educational and professional services to minorities and underprivileged groups. Dr. Graves teaches Black Political Thought, African Political Thought, American Government, and American Political Thought. He won the Outstanding Teaching Award in 2015 from Mt. Hood Community College and the MU Faculty Achievement Award in Diversity in 2017 from the University of Missouri.

Sheena Greitens

Sheena Greitens

Affiliated Faculty,

Sheena Chestnut Greitens is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Missouri. She is also a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Center for East Asian Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution and an Associate in Research at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University. Dr. Greitens holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University; an M.Phil from Oxford University, where she studied as a Marshall Scholar; and a B.A. from Stanford University. Her research and teaching focus on East Asian security and the politics of democracy and dictatorship. Her first book, Dictators and Their Secret Police: Coercive Institutions and State Violence, was published in summer 2016 by Cambridge University Press.

Kate Griese

Kate Griese

Kinder Scholars,

Kate Griese is a sophomore at MU from Wildwood, Missouri, double-majoring in Political Science and English. On-campus, Kate has been involved with It’s On Us, Greek Allies, Mizzou Alternative Breaks, The Chancellor’s Leadership Class, Greek Goes Green, and Pi Beta Phi, and off-campus, she has interned with the Missouri Democratic Coordinated Campaign. After graduation, Kate plans to move to Washington, D.C., and pursue a career in political communications.

Gage Grispino

Gage Grispino

Kinder Scholars,

Hailing from Maryville, MO, Gage Grispino is a junior at the University of Missouri, majoring in Biochemistry and pursuing a minor in Political Science. On campus, Gage served during AY 2018-19 as the Missouri Students Association budget chair, is involved in various pre-medical activities, and is an active member of Mizzou Alternative Breaks. After graduation, he hopes to obtain his M.D. from the University of Missouri and return to Maryville, MO, to practice. In addition to serving as a physician, Gage hopes to play an active role in healthcare policymaking both at home and abroad.

Alex Hackworth

Alex Hackworth

Undergraduate Fellows, Kinder Scholars,

Alex Hackworth is a third-year student at the University of Missouri, pursuing degrees in Biology and Psychology and minors in Sociology and Criminal Justice. Outside of coursework, he has dedicated himself to various organizations on campus: he is a student lobbyist with the Associated Students of the University of Missouri, President of the Phi Sigma Pi Honor Fraternity, a re-founding father for the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity, and a member of the Mizzou Student Foundation. More than anything, he’s a lover of learning, a watcher of sports, a rock-climbing regular, and a friend to all.

Sam Halabi

Sam Halabi

Affiliated Faculty,

Sam Halabi is an Associate Professor at the University of Missouri School of Law as well as the 2017-18 Fulbright Canada Research Chair in Health Law, Policy, and Ethics at the University of Ottawa. He is also a non-resident Scholar at the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University. Professor Halabi researches legal and regulatory approaches to infectious disease, including the constitutional division of authority between local, state, and federal governments toward health threats, vaccination policy, and the public health origins of the police power. He is the editor (with Larry Gostin and Jeff Crowley) of Global Management of Infectious Disease after Ebola (Oxford University Press, 2016), as well as Food and Drug Law in an Era of Globalized Markets (Elsevier Academic Press, 2015). His work is published in JAMA, the Lancet, and the Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics, among others. He is also the co-chair (with Gian Luca Burci) of the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Working Group of the Global Virome Project, and he is a former judicial clerk to the Honorable Nanette K. Laughrey of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Missouri. He holds a JD from Harvard Law School, an MPhil from the University of Oxford (St. Antony’s College), and a B.S., summa cum laude, from Kansas State University.

Jake Haselswerdt

Jake Haselswerdt

Affiliated Faculty,

Jake Haselswerdt received his PhD from George Washington University and joined the MU faculty as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and Truman School of Public Affairs in 2016, after serving as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of Michigan and in U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer’s office through the American Political Science Association’s Congressional Fellowship Program. His research centers around the politics of U.S. public policy, with a particular focus on the political causes and consequences of policy choice and implementation in the substantive realms of health, social, and tax policy. These interests encompass several different strands of current scholarly pursuits which span the study of institutions and behavior. One current project, for example, deals with understanding the reasons for policy outcomes (e.g., why have some states chosen to cooperate with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, while others have not?). Another examines the political consequences of policy enactments and policy design choices (e.g., how has ACA implementation affected political engagement and participation? How does policy design shape the way the public thinks about that policy and the people who benefit from it?). Recently, he has also begun projects on the role of self-interest in attitudes about social policies like Medicare and student debt relief and on the potential of research on health outcomes to influence the policy process in other areas, like economic policy.

Erin Hawley

Erin Hawley

Faculty Fellows,

Kinder Institute Senior Fellow
Erin Morrow Hawley is Senior Fellow at the Kinder Institute and former Associate Professor of Law at the University of Missouri School of Law. She has litigated extensively before the United States Supreme Court as well as numerous federal courts of appeals and state courts of last resort. As a Fellow at the Kinder Institute, she is developing coursework and programming for students to gain hands-on experience learning about constitutional litigation and the judicial process. After completing her B.S. in animal science at Texas A&M University, Prof. Hawley received her law degree from Yale Law School where she served as an editor on the Yale Law Journal and executive editor of Yale Journal on Regulation, and a was Coker fellow (teaching assistant in constitutional law). Prof. Hawley’s research interests include the separation of powers, federal courts, agricultural law, and administrative law. Her work has been published in numerous top law journals and she is a frequent national commentator on legal issues.

She is a former clerk to Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. of the Supreme Court of the United States and Judge J. Harvie Wilkinson III of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, and served as Counsel to United States Attorney General Michael Mukasey at the Department of Justice.

Rodolfo Hernandez

Rodolfo Hernandez

PostDoctoral Fellows,

Kinder Institute Postdoctoral Fellow in Political Thought & Constitutionalism
Rodolfo (Rudy) Hernandez earned his B.A. in Liberal Arts from St. John’s College in Annapolis, MD, and his Ph.D. in Political Science from Louisiana State University. His work focuses on political theory and American political development, and his dissertation considers the political economy of Abraham Lincoln’s thought, especially as it relates to the principle of equality expressed by the Declaration of Independence. As a graduate student, he was awarded the Huel D. Perkins Fellowship by LSU and the Richard M. Weaver Fellowship by the Intercollegiate Studies Institute. Rudy previously taught as a Visiting Instructor at Louisiana Tech University and as a Senior Lecturer at Texas State University, and he also has prior government experience including serving in Americorps, working as a tax examiner in the U.S. Treasury Department, and eight years in the U.S. Army Reserve. He joins the Kinder Institute as a 2018-2019 Postdoctoral Fellow in Political Thought & Constitutionalism.

Erin Holmes

Erin Holmes

PostDoctoral Fellows,

Kinder Institute Postdoctoral Fellow in Political History
Erin Holmes holds a B.A. in History from the College of William and Mary, a Certificate in Early American History and Museum Studies from the National Institute of American History and Democracy, a Ph.D. in History from the University of South Carolina, and a Certificate in Historical Archaeology and Cultural Resource Management from the USC Department of Anthropology. Her manuscript project, The House that Slavery Built: Social and Material Transformation in the British Atlantic World, 1670-1831, explores how the built environment—buildings, landscapes, objects, and the spaces in between—shaped the experience of slavery within the plantation house, transforming colonial identity to create the conditions that made the American Revolution possible. Her research has been funded by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon, among others, and from 2017-2019, she was an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow at the American Philosophical Society. She joins the Kinder Institute as a Postdoctoral Fellow in Political History.

 

Bill Horner

Bill Horner

Affiliated Faculty,

Bill Horner is Director of Undergraduate Studies and Teaching Professor in the Department of Political Science. He studied Radio, Television, and Film as an undergraduate at Northwestern University before completing graduate degrees in Political Science at Arizona State University (M.A.) and the University of Texas at Austin (Ph.D.). He is the author of Showdown in the Show-Me State (2005) and Ohio’s Kingmaker: Mark Hanna, Man and Myth (2010), and Saturday Night Live and the 1976 Presidential Election (2018), with MU Chair of Theatre Heather Carver. In addition, he is the co-author, with MU Professor of Political Science James Endersby, of Lloyd Gaines and the Fight to End Segregation, the first book published on the Kinder Institute’s Studies in Constitutional Democracy series with University of Missouri Press. Since arriving at the University of Missouri, Professor Horner has twice been awarded the Purple Chalk Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Education and has also received the prestigious William T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence and the Chancellor’s Excellence Award for Lifetime Achievement in Advising for his work with Pi Sigma Alpha, the Political Science Department’s honors organization.

Catherine Hutinett

Catherine Hutinett

Undergraduate Fellows,

From Lee’s Summit, MO, Catherine Hutinett is a junior at the University of Missouri, double-majoring in History and Anthropology and minoring in Spanish. She is a trumpet player in Marching Mizzou and is involved with the Mizzou Undergraduate History Society and the Anthropology Student Association. She is passionate about early American history and in the summer of 2018, she interned at George Washington’s Mount Vernon estate, just outside of Washington, D.C. After graduation, she plans to attend graduate school and eventually become a historian.

Thomas Kane

Thomas Kane

Staff,

Kinder Institute Communications Associate
Raised in Nashville, Tennessee, Thomas Kane earned a B.A. in English from Yale University, an M.F.A. in creative writing from the University of Pittsburgh and a Ph.D. in English from the University of Missouri, where he wrote a critical dissertation on representations of democratic order in the American long poem and a creative dissertation on fractured modes of communication in the digital age. His current research examines creative agency in early American poetry and political writings. While at the University of Pittsburgh, he edited and co-translated Tomaz Salamun’s 2009 collection of poems There’s the Hand and There’s the Arid Chair (Counterpath Press). Thomas served as Assistant Coordinator of Scholarly Programs during the Kinder Institute’s first year and has since taken the position of Communications Associate.

Ilyana Karthas

Ilyana Karthas

Affiliated Faculty,

Ilyana Karthas is an Associate Professor of History at University of Missouri and an affiliate faculty member in the Women’s and Gender Studies Department, where she served as the first Scholar’s Chair in 2010-11. She received her Ph.D. and M.A. in History from Brown University, as well as an M.A. in Women’s Studies and History from Oxford University, and she taught for three years in the History Department and Women’s Studies Program at McGill University before coming to MU in 2007. Her research area is 19th and early 20th-century French intellectual, cultural, and gender history, with an emphasis on national identity formation, modern aesthetics, gender ideology, and the politics of the body. Prof. Karthas’ book, When Ballet Became French: Modern Ballet and the Cultural Politics of France (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015), is the first book-length study to address how and why ballet revived in early 20th-century France after a long period of decline, and her current book project, Authority of the Mind: Women Critics, the Shaping of the Performing Arts, and the Politics of Culture in early 20th Century France, investigates women’s roles as “authorities on culture” in France. She regularly teaches courses on topics including the intellectual and cultural history of Europe, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the history/politics of the body and sexuality, and she was awarded the campus-wide Maxine Christopher Shutz Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2013.

 

Lael Keiser

Lael Keiser

Affiliated Faculty,

Lael Keiser is a Professor and Chair in the University of Missouri Department of Political Science and Director of MU’s Truman School of Public Affairs. She completed her M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.  Her research interests fall at the intersection of political science, public administration, and public policy, with particular points of focus on how the representation of minorities and women within public organizations affects government legitimacy and policy outcomes, as well as on the role of the bureaucracy in creating public policy within the constraints of constitutional democracy. Professor Keiser regularly teaches courses on the policy-making process, bureaucracy, and administrative politics, and she is currently working on a book project that examines the role of professional associations representing street-level bureaucrats in improving the implementation of public policy and the responsiveness of the bureaucracy to elected officials and federal executives.

William Kemp

William Kemp

Undergraduate Fellows,

William C. Kemp is a native of Northern Virginia, pursuing a degree in Political Science with a minor in Business and a certificate in American Constitutional Democracy from the Kinder Institute. He has interned for Roy Blunt’s U.S. Senate campaign in Missouri and with the State Department at the U.S. Embassy in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. His extracurricular activities at the University of Missouri include serving as Vice President of the Mizzou Student Foundation, a coordinator and counselor for Camp Kesem, and Service Chair of Beta Theta Pi, and he has also participated in the Mizzou Political Science Club and the Jefferson Book Club. William is passionate about U.S. history and the influence of ancient and enlightenment philosophy, and he plans to attend law school and pursue a career with the State Department after graduating. He joins the Kinder Institute as one of two inaugural affiliated undergraduate fellows.

Richard D. Kinder

Richard D. Kinder

Advisory Board,

Richard D. Kinder is Executive Chairman of Kinder Morgan, Inc., the largest energy infrastructure company in America, which he co-founded in February 1997. Under his leadership, Kinder Morgan has grown from a small company with 175 employees to a corporation with almost 12,000 employees. He receives a salary of $1 a year and owns approximately 11 percent of Kinder Morgan. Mr. Kinder is a past recipient of Morningstar’s CEO of the Year award.

Kinder Morgan owns an interest in or operates 84,000 miles of pipelines and approximately 165 terminals. The company’s pipelines transport primarily natural gas, refined petroleum products, CO2, and crude oil, and its terminals store, transfer, and handle such products as gasoline, ethanol, coal, petroleum coke, and steel.

Mr. Kinder received his undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Missouri and served in Vietnam as a Captain in the U.S. Army. He has served on numerous corporate and non-profit boards and is a life trustee and current Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. He is also chairman of the Kinder Foundation.

LaGarrett King

LaGarrett King

Affiliated Faculty,

LaGarrett J. King is an Assistant Professor of Social Studies Education in the College of Education at the University of Missouri. Dr. King taught high school social studies for 8 years and earned his Ph.D. in 2012 at the University of Texas at Austin. He is an award-winning scholar whose research centers on Black History Education, Social Studies and Curriculum Foundations, Race Critical Theories and Knowledge, Cultural Studies, and Critical Multicultural Teacher Education.  His work has been published in Race, Ethnicity, and Education, Theory and Research in Social Education, Journal of Negro Education, and Teaching Education.

Brian Kisida

Brian Kisida

Affiliated Faculty,

Brian Kisida is an Assistant Professor in the Truman School of Public Affairs at the University of Missouri who focuses on education policy, experimental design, and causal inference. The dominant theme of his research focuses on identifying effective educational options and experiences for at-risk students that can close achievement gaps, experience gaps, and attainment gaps. His research has examined the broad educational benefits of school partnerships with cultural institutions and community arts organizations, teacher diversity, school integration, and urban school choice. His academic publications include articles in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Sociology of Education, Educational Researcher, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness, Economics of Education Review, and Policy Studies Journal. He has also co-authored three congressionally mandated experimental evaluation reports for the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences. His work has been cited in congressional testimony before the U.S. House and Senate, and it has appeared in numerous media outlets, including The New York Times, USA Today, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and CNN.

Sarah Beth V. Kitch

Sarah Beth V. Kitch

Kinder Institute Faculty,

Kinder Institute Assistant Professor of Constitutional Democracy, Assistant Professor of Public Affairs
Sarah Beth V. Kitch joins the Kinder Institute as Assistant Professor of Constitutional Democracy and Assistant Professor of Public Affairs. Her research examines sources for ethical action, and she works particularly in the context of American democracy at the intersection of race and citizenship. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Louisiana State University and has published in the American Journal of Political Science and the Journal of Church and State.  Before making her way to Missouri, Dr. Kitch was an Instructor of Political Science at Louisiana State University, the 2016-2017 Thomas W. Smith Postdoctoral Research Associate at Princeton University, and a Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science at Northern Illinois University.

Thom Lambert

Thom Lambert

Affiliated Faculty,

Thom Lambert received his J.D. from the University of Chicago and currently serves as Professor and Wall Chair in Corporate Law and Governance at the University of Missouri School of Law. His scholarship focuses on antitrust, corporate, and regulatory matters, and he is the co-author of Antitrust Law: Interpretation and Implementation (5th ed., Foundation Press, 2013) and the author or co-author of over 20 scholarly articles, which have appeared in journals and publications including, Antitrust Bulletin, the Boston College Law Review, the Minnesota Law Review, the Texas Law Review, and the Yale Journal on Regulation. He also blogs regularly at “Truth on the Market,” a site focused on academic commentary on antitrust, business, and economic legal issues. He is a past recipient of the Law School’s Blackwell Sanders Peper Martin Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award for teaching excellence; the MU-wide Gold Chalk Award for Excellence in Teaching at the graduate level; and the 2007 and 2011 Shook Hardy & Bacon Excellence in Research Awards for best law faculty scholarship. Prior to joining the faculty at the Law School, he practiced law in the Chicago office of Sidley Austin; served as a John M. Olin Fellow at Northwestern University School of Law and the Center for the Study of American Business; and clerked for Judge Jerry E. Smith of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Zach Lang

Zach Lang

Graduate Fellows,

Kinder Institute Ph.D. Fellow in Political Science
Zach Lang earned his B.A. in Government from St. Lawrence University and is currently a Ph.D. student in the Political Science Department at MU. His research is focused on American economic and foreign policy analysis, and he will serve during Fall 2019 as a Graduate Teaching Assistant for Dr. Rudy Hernandez’s “Liberty, Justice, and the Common Good” class. In his spare time, he enjoys running, hiking, kayaking, film, and video games.

Clyde Graves Lear

Clyde Graves Lear

Advisory Board,

Clyde Lear is the retired Chairman and CEO of Learfield Communications Inc., a company he started in 1972 as an outgrowth of his Master’s project at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. The company, which entered the college sports business in 1975, recently merged with IMG College and is now called Learfield/IMG College.

Learfield/IMG College is the preeminent leader in the collegiate sports marketing arena and is the exclusive provider of marketing services for athletic departments at 220 major universities. The Plano, TX-based company has offices in 250 cities. In addition, Learfield/IMG College has branched out into other affiliated businesses, including licensing, ticket sales and systems, LED displays and scoreboards, collegiate athletic websites, and digital media and brand marketing. The company also operates the nation’s largest agricultural radio network, the Brownfield Network, and four state news networks. Today, Learfield/IMG College has roughly 2,500 employees.

Lear received a Master’s degree in Broadcast Journalism from the University of Missouri in 1968 and an AB degree in 1966 from Central Methodist University (CMU) in Fayette, Missouri. He attended high school in Jefferson City, where he was born in 1944.

Lear is a leader in higher education. For 13 years, he served on the Board of Curators of CMU and for five years was its Chair. He was named a member of the 1992 Class of Distinguished Alumni from the University of Missouri and was a past recipient of the Edward R. Murrow Award, both distinctions in acknowledgment of his significant contribution to media in America. He has also been a leader in the Missouri Governor’s Student Leadership Forum since its inception 32 years ago; was President of Jefferson City’s Memorial Community Hospital; is an Eagle Scout and a member of the Board of Central Bank and the National Board for Young Life; and was enshrined into the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame.

Clyde and his wife of 53 years, Sue, have three grown children and six grandchildren.

One of his great loves is mentoring. He and Sue use their resources to develop outstanding executives and leaders, and he gives significant time to helping college age—and post-college age—men and women grow spiritually, personally, and professionally.

Paul Litton

Paul Litton

Affiliated Faculty,

Paul Litton is the Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and the R.B. Price Professor of Law at MU’s School of Law. Before joining the faculty in 2006, he earned a J.D. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Pennsylvania and spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Clinical Bioethics within the National Institutes of Health. Dean Litton also served two years as a law clerk to Chief Justice Deborah T. Poritz of the New Jersey Supreme Court, serving a second term as the court’s death penalty law clerk. While at Mizzou, he has co-chaired the Missouri Death Penalty Assessment Team, assembled by the American Bar Association to study and make recommendations regarding the laws and practices of Missouri’s capital system. Dean Litton publishes scholarship relating to criminal law, bioethics, and their intersection, and he teaches Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Death Penalty Law, Bioethics, and Jurisprudence.

Xavier Lukasek

Xavier Lukasek

Kinder Scholars,

Xavier Lukasek is an MU junior from Imperial, MO, majoring in Political Science and History, with a minor in Sociology. Lifelong interests in political history, foreign policy, and international elections led to Xavier becoming a research assistant in the Political Science department and a legislative intern in the Missouri House of Representatives for the 2018 session. Xavier has also worked as a contract employee for the Missouri Department of Revenue for the past three years and is a member of the Kinder Institute’s 2018-19 Society of Fellows. Currently, he plans to attend graduate school after he completes his B.A.

Cassandra Marks

Cassandra Marks

Undergraduate Fellows,

Cassandra Marks, from Warrensburg, MO, is a sophomore at the University of Missouri, studying Economics and Political Science with minors in Spanish and American Constitutional Democracy. In her free time, she likes to read, cook, and spend time with friends and family, and after graduating, she hopes to study law and public policy and to pursue a career in civic leadership and government.

Jennifer Marx

Jennifer Marx

Undergraduate Fellows,

Originally from Kansas City, Jennifer Marx is a junior at the University of Missouri, majoring in Biology with a minor in Political Science. In addition to being a research assistant in an immunology lab on campus, Jennifer volunteers in the Emergency Department at University Hospital, serves as a member of Global Brigades, and will participate in the 2019 Kinder Scholars D.C. Summer Program. Following her undergraduate studies, Jennifer plans to attend medical school and pursue a career in medicine.

Mateo Mateo-Mateo

Mateo Mateo-Mateo

Undergraduate Fellows,

Mateo Mateo-Mateo is a junior Accountancy major and Political Science minor at MU, and a Vasey Scholar in the College of Business. He hails from an agricultural farming community in Immokalee, FL, 30 miles north of one of the wealthiest cities in America (Naples, FL). In Summer 2018, he was a member of the Kinder Scholars cohort in D.C., where he interned for Senator Claire McCaskill during the day and walked the monuments at night. This summer, he will be returning to the capital to intern for PricewaterhouseCoopers, enabling him to refine his accounting skills and to rekindle his passion for visiting the Florida House on Capitol Hill. Mateo is also site leading an upcoming international service trip to Monte Cristi, Dominican Republic, and he serves as an executive board member for a political organization on campus and has worked on campaigns related to this organization’s mission.

Sijan McGinnis

Sijan McGinnis

Undergraduate Fellows,

Hailing from Higginsville, MO, Sijan McGinnis is a senior at the University of Missouri, working toward a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science, with plans to minor in Russian Studies and American Constitutional Democracy. Growing up in a law enforcement family, Sijan has long held a strong interest in law and policy, and during his time at Mizzou, he has pursued this interest through internships with the State Legislature, the Missouri Governor’s Office, and the United States Senate in Washington, D.C. He has also served as a field representative for Missouri HRCC, and he currently is a part-time Legislative Assistant in the Missouri House of Representatives. After completing his undergraduate studies, he plans to pursue law school and, after that, a career in national security and policy.

Riley Messer

Riley Messer

Kinder Scholars,

Riley Messer is an MU Junior from Kansas City, MO, majoring in Political Science and minoring in American Constitutional Democracy and History. On campus, she is Vice President of the Pi Sigma Alpha Political Science Honor Society and a former undergraduate fellow with the Kinder Institute, and she has interned with Nicole Galloway for Missouri and Claire McCaskill’s Columbia office. After graduating from Mizzou, Riley plans to attend law school to pursue her interest in civil rights law and public policy.

Jeffrey Milyo

Jeffrey Milyo

Affiliated Faculty,

Jeffrey Milyo is Professor of Economics at the University of Missouri and senior fellow at the Cato Institute in Washington, DC. He earned a Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford University and served on the faculty of Tufts University and the University of Chicago before coming to MU in 2004. Professor Milyo teaches courses in political economics, law and economics, health economics, and the economics of discrimination. Professor Milyo’s research interests include American politics and public policy evaluation, and his recent work investigates the efficacy of campaign finance reforms, the effects of voter ID laws, disparities in policing and sentencing, and the causes and consequences of political corruption.

S. David Mitchell

S. David Mitchell

Affiliated Faculty,

Professor S. David Mitchell is a member of the University of Missouri School of Law faculty. He teaches Torts, Advanced Torts, Criminal Justice Administrations, Collateral Consequences of Sentencing, and Law & Society, and his research is on the collateral consequences of sentencing and ex-offender reentry. He earned his J.D. and Ph.D. (Sociology) from the University of Pennsylvania, and before joining the faculty at University of Missouri, he worked as a Scholar in Residence in the Sociology Department at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has served as a law clerk to the Honorable Andre M. Davis (D. Md.) and is currently a member of the Missouri Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He is also an Affiliate of the Black Studies and Sociology Departments.  Recently, he has served as the Chair of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Task Force and the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Advisory Council.  In 2015, he was a recipient of the MU President’s Award for Community Engagement.

Sara Scholes Morgan

Sara Scholes Morgan

Advisory Board,

Sara has been involved in non-profit, civic, and political organizations for over fifty years, in seven different cities, including Kansas City and Washington, D.C., and four different states (MO, VA, FL, TX). She is the co-founder and past president of the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, which opened in September 2001, and currently serves on its board of directors. In addition to serving on the Advisory Board for the Kinder Institute, she is on the board of the Houston Grand Opera and The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and is a Life Trustee and board member of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City. Sara is also a past board member and Life Trustee of the American Craft Council and has served on the boards of the Children’s Museum of Houston and Girls, Inc., among other organizations.

Sara and Bill Morgan have been married for 53 years and have two children, Catherine and Mike, who is married to Chrissi. They have three grandchildren, Emma (21), Will (18), and Kate (15). Sara is a graduate of the University of Missouri with a degree in Political Science.

Laura Murgatroyd

Laura Murgatroyd

Kinder Scholars,

Laura Murgatroyd is an international student from Leeds, England, pursuing degrees in Journalism and Political Science. She is currently working with the Columbia Missourian as a state government reporter, and she previously interned at the Columbia Chamber of Commerce. In addition, she recently represented the MU Journalism School at the National Conference on Ethics in America at West Point Military Academy. Passionate about service, Laura is involved with the Alpha Phi Omega national service fraternity and works with Mizzou Alternative Breaks as a participant and weekend site leader.

Marvin Overby

Marvin Overby

Affiliated Faculty,

Marvin Overby (A.B., Davidson; Ph.D., Oklahoma) has been a member of the faculty in the MU Department of Political Science since 2002, after previous appointments at Loyola University Chicago and the University of Mississippi.  He has also served as a visiting scholar in the Department of American Studies at the University of Szeged (Hungary) and the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies.  His research on American politics (particularly the Congress and Southern politics) has appeared in leading disciplinary journals, including American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, and Journal of Politics.  His current research projects examine legislative retirements in the United States and other countries.  At Mizzou, he leads the “Developing Dynamics of Democracy” summer study abroad course, and he has been recognized with the Ann K. Covington Award for Undergraduate Mentoring and the Provost’s Award for Leadership in International Education. Prof. Overby will spend 2018-19 as a Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Library of Congress’ John W. Kluge Center, where he’ll be conducting research for his current book project, which examines the most important congressional elections in U.S. history.

Ken Owen

Ken Owen

Faculty Fellows,

2019-20 Kinder Institute Distinguished Visiting Research Fellow
Kenneth Owen is Associate Professor of History at the University of Illinois Springfield. His research interests lie primarily in the political history of the United States, focusing particularly on the relationship between governments and the people. His published essays include discussions of political legitimacy, and of the political uses of violence in the early republic.

Dr. Owen received his BA, MSt and DPhil from The Queen’s College, University of Oxford. Before arriving in the Midwest, he taught at the University of Sussex and Ohio University. His first book,  Political Community in Revolutionary Pennsylvania, 1774-1800, was published with Oxford University Press in 2018.

Dr. Owen has additional teaching interests in digital history and the history of sports. He is a founder member of The Junto blog, and the host of their podcast, The Juntocast. He will serve during AY 2019-20 as a Distinguished Visiting Research Fellow at the Kinder Institute, where he will be working on a project investigating the long history of secession movements within the United States.

Patrick Oxford

Patrick Oxford

Advisory Board,

Patrick Oxford is the Chairman and former Managing Partner of Bracewell LLP. Before assuming the role of Managing Partner and to a limited extent thereafter, Mr. Oxford’s practice has focused on business transactions involving energy and banking clients of the firm. In addition to his ongoing role in the firm’s strategic initiatives, Mr. Oxford continues to counsel clients on the legal and public aspects of their business strategies and coordinates the prompt and efficient discharge of their engagements by the firm.

Mr. Oxford received his B.B.A., with honors, from the University of Texas at Austin and his J.D., with honors, from the University of Texas School of Law, where he served as Managing Editor of the Texas Law Review. For many years, he has been deeply involved in the business and civic affairs of Houston and the State of Texas. He was appointed by then-Governor George W. Bush to the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System, a nine member board which oversees the 15 institutions of the UT System as well as the University of Texas Investment Management Company and its $16 billion in assets.

Since leaving the Board of Regents, Mr. Oxford has continued his interest in health affairs, serving as a Director of M.D. Anderson Services Corp., the outreach component of the nation’s highest ranking cancer hospital, as a member of the Executive Committee leading M.D. Anderson’s Board of Visitors, and as a member of the board of directors of Texas Medical Center, Inc., which coordinates the activities in and around the Texas Medical Center, the world’s largest. He also has served as board chairman of BioHouston, a consortium of Houston’s academic medical institutions, science centers and interested companies formed to promote the biotech, nanotech, and informatics industries in the city.

Mr. Oxford is a past Chairman of the Greater Houston Partnership which is comprised of the CEO of Houston’s business and professional community. He is also active in local, state, and national politics, having served as chairman of the campaign committees for five officeholders who have served Texas statewide and in lead roles in 3 presidential campaigns.

Jeffrey L. Pasley

Jeffrey L. Pasley

Kinder Institute Faculty,

Associate Director of the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy, Professor of History & Journalism
Jeffrey L. Pasley is Professor of History and Journalism and Associate Director of the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy. A graduate of Carleton College, he was a reporter-researcher for The New Republic and a speechwriter for Al Gore’s 1988 presidential campaign before entering academia. He completed his Ph.D. in the History of American Civilization at Harvard University and taught at Florida State University before coming to Missouri in 1999. His teaching and research focus on American political culture between the American Revolution and the Civil War. Professor Pasley is co-editor of Beyond the Founders: New Approaches to the Political History of the Early American Republic (2004) and author of “The Tyranny of Printers”: Newspaper Politics in the Early American Republic (2001) and The First Presidential Contest: The Election of 1796 and the Beginnings of American Democracy (2013), the latter of which was named a finalist for the prestigious George Washington Book Prize.

Jordan Pellerito

Jordan Pellerito

Graduate Fellows,

Collegiate Fellow, Kinder Institute Residential College
Jordan Pellerito holds B.A.s in History and Political Science and an M.A. in History from the University of Missouri. Her Master’s thesis explored how African and Native Americans received the Marquis de Lafayette as a symbol of the American Revolution during his 1824-1825 tour, and how this contributes to the Era of Good Feelings discourse. As an undergraduate, she was a member of the Kinder Institute’s Society of Fellows and for the past three years has served as the Teaching Assistant-in-Residence for the Kinder Scholars D.C. Summer Program’s “Beltway History & Politics” course. Jordan is now a Ph.D. student in the History Department, where she will focus on public and antebellum history, and she will serve during AY 2019-20 as the Kinder Institute’s inaugural Collegiate Fellow, coordinating academic and extracurricular programming for the new Residential College.

Andrew Pogue

Andrew Pogue

Kinder Scholars,

Raised in Clinton, MO, Andrew Pogue is a Sophomore at the University of Missouri, pursuing a Business degree with minors in History and Military Science. He loves to spend his free time hiking and reading American history. At Mizzou, he is involved with the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, the Mizzou Army ROTC battalion, and the Kinder Institute Society of Fellows. After graduation, Andrew plans to pursue a law degree and an M.B.A., while also serving in the Army Reserves.

Katie Reich

Katie Reich

Undergraduate Fellows,

Originally from Mt. Vernon, Illinois, Katie Reich is attending Mizzou for Journalism and Political Science. Katie is an active member of Kappa Alpha MU, participating in the creation of multimedia stories that highlight members of the Columbia community, and she also volunteers at Peace Nook in downtown Columbia. In the future, she hopes to attend law school.

Al Zuercher Reichardt

Al Zuercher Reichardt

Kinder Institute Faculty,

Kinder Institute Assistant Professor of Constitutional Democracy, Assistant Professor of History
Al Zuercher Reichardt received her Ph.D. at Yale University and joined the Kinder Institute faculty in Fall 2018 as an Assistant Professor of Constitutional Democracy and Assistant Professor of History, after spending a year as a junior visiting fellow at the Center for Humanities & Information at the Pennsylvania State University. Her research revolves around 18th century European and indigenous empires in North America and the Atlantic World. Her current project examines the contest for the American Interior in the decades before the American Revolution, and maps the development of communications infrastructure over the long Seven Years’ War, and her next project will turn towards the spatial politics of native and Euro-American transportation landscapes, from the colonial period through the rise of the early American state. ​

Joseph Ross

Joseph Ross

Graduate Fellows,

Kinder Institute Ph.D. Fellow in Political History
Joseph Ross completed his B.A. in History at The Ohio State University and his M.A. in History at Ohio University, and he joins the Kinder Institute as the inaugural Ph.D. Fellow in Political History. His research focuses on the early American West from the eighteenth to the nineteenth century, with particular attention paid to how political and economic ideologies informed the policies of Great Britain and the United States, how those policies remained the same or changed over time, and the effects they had on Native American relations and western land development. He is also interested in the emergence of the early American state on the frontier and how federal institutions like the land office became sites for political development in the western territories. In his spare time, he enjoys hiking, kayaking, film, and retro video gaming.

Catherine Rymph

Catherine Rymph

Affiliated Faculty,

Catherine Rymph joined the MU Department of History in 2000, which she now serves as chair of, after teaching at the University of Iowa and as a Fulbright Lecturer at the University of Greifswald in Germany. She specializes in recent U.S. history, especially U.S. women’s political history. She is the author of Republican Women: Feminism and Conservatism from Suffrage to the Rise of the New Right (2006), a political history of feminism and conservatism within the Republican Party, and Raising Government Children: A History of Foster Care and the American Welfare State (2017). Professor Rymph regularly teaches courses on U.S. women’s political history, historical perspectives on child welfare and the family, and twentieth-century U.S. history.

Ariana Santilli

Ariana Santilli

Kinder Scholars,

Ariana Santilli is a Sophomore at the University of Missouri, majoring in International Studies with a minor in Italian. As a member of Period At Mizzou, Ariana is passionate about advocating for women’s health issues that often go unaddressed due to cultural and/or religious stigmas. Ariana also enjoys studying women’s roles in global communities, as well as sexual and reproductive health rights, and upon graduation, she hopes to publish writings on the topic of female empowerment and engage in advocacy work abroad.

Kaitlyn Sawyer

Kaitlyn Sawyer

Undergraduate Fellows,

Kaitlyn Sawyer is a senior from Joliet, Illinois, studying Political Science and Economics. Her involvement with the Kinder Institute started in Spring 2019 when she participated in the Global History at Oxford study abroad program. The experience led her to continue to critically analyze historical events and engage in discussions about the nuances of the global economy. Throughout her time on campus, she has been very purposeful in selecting academic and professional development programs to enhance her interest in politics, finance, and law. Kaitlyn has interned for the Missouri House of Representatives, the law office of Smith and Parnell, and Bank of America, as part of their Summer Advisor Development Program. On-campus, she is employed through Residential Life as a Resident Advisor for Brooks Hall and serves as President of the Black Pre-Law Students Association and as the Missouri Students Association’s Campus Affairs Committee Chairwoman. After graduation, she aspires to attend law school and become a corporate lawyer. Outside of academics and student leadership, Kaitlyn enjoys bike riding, exercising, reading, and is an avid sports fan. Her favorite sports teams are the Chicago Cubs and New Orleans Saints.

Jennifer L. Selin

Jennifer L. Selin

Kinder Institute Faculty,

Kinder Institute Assistant Professor of Constitutional Democracy, Assistant Professor of Political Science & Public Affairs
Jennifer L. Selin joins the Kinder Institute as an Assistant Professor of Constitutional Democracy and Assistant Professor of Political Science. Professor Selin’s research illustrates that the structure of the federal administrative state has important implications for political influence. She is a co-author of the Administrative Conference of the United States’ Sourcebook of United States Executive Agencies, and her scholarship has been published in political science, public administration, and law journals. Prof. Selin holds a Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University and a J.D. from Wake Forest University. Prior to pursuing her Ph.D., she practiced administrative law and specialized in electricity market regulation and alternative energy development, licensing, and regulation.

Jay Sexton

Jay Sexton

Kinder Institute Faculty, Advisory Board,

Kinder Institute Endowed Chair in Constitutional Democracy, Professor of History
Jay Sexton is the inaugural Kinder Institute Chair in Constitutional Democracy and Professor of History. A native of Salina, Kansas and graduate of KU, he returned to the Midwest to the University of Missouri in 2016 after spending the better part of two decades at Oxford University in England. Sexton started in Oxford as a grad student Marshall Scholar and worked his way up to being Director of the Rothermere American Institute and, upon his departure, being elected to the honorary title of Distinguished Fellow.

Sexton specializes in the political and economic history of the nineteenth century. His research situates the United States in its international context, particularly as it related to the dominant global structure of the era, the British Empire. He is the author of Debtor Diplomacy: Finance and American Foreign Relations in the Civil War Era, 1837-1873 (Oxford, 2005; 2nd ed. 2014) and The Monroe Doctrine: Empire and Nation in Nineteenth-Century America (Hill and Wang, 2011). He also has published two major collaborative projects: The Global Lincoln (co-edited with Richard Carwardine, Oxford, 2011) and Empire’s Twin: U.S. Anti-Imperialism from the Founding to the Age of Terrorism (co-edited with Ian Tyrrell, Cornell, 2015). His newest book, A Nation Forged by Crisis: A New American History, was published in October 2018 from Basic Books.

Currently, Sexton is at work on a book that explores how steam infrastructure conditioned the connections and relations between the United States and the wider world in the second half of the nineteenth century. He also is co-editing the second volume of Cambridge University Press’ Cambridge History of America and the World with Prof. Kristin Hoganson of University of Illinois, and the two are additionally working on a collaborative project on “transimperialism”–the crossings and intersections between empires in the nineteenth century.

Sexton enjoys working with enterprising students, undergrad or grad, who set their own intellectual agenda. When he is not reading or talking history, he is cheering for KC sports teams and following British politics.

Rachel Slings

Rachel Slings

Undergraduate Fellows,

Rachel Slings is a junior in the MU Honors College, studying Secondary Education, with an emphasis in Language Arts, and pursuing a double minor in American Constitutional Democracy and Spanish. After graduating, she hopes to teach creative writing for several years before beginning work toward a Master’s in Education Policy and a law degree. Rachel is a member of Alpha Omega Epsilon, Amnesty International, and the Middleton Fellows, and she is also continuing research she began during her Discovery Fellowship. She works on campus as a Study Plan Consultant at the Student Success Center and is in training to be a Diversity Peer Educator. During the weekends, she can be found car hopping at Sonic, and in her free time, she volunteers as a tutor for high school athletes and enjoys cooking, writing, and spending time with friends.

Robert Smale

Robert Smale

Affiliated Faculty,

Robert L. Smale is Associate Professor of History at MU. After earning B.A. degrees in History and Spanish at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, he went on to complete his M.A. and Ph.D. in History at the University of Texas at Austin, where he specialized in the study of Latin America. His research focuses on the political and social history of South America’s Andean nations. He is the author of “I Sweat the Flavor of Tin”: Labor Activism in Early Twentieth-Century Bolivia (2010). He regularly teaches courses on the history of constitutional democracy in Latin America and the region’s revolutionary traditions.

Claire Smrt

Claire Smrt

Kinder Scholars,

Claire Smrt is a sophomore from Kansas City, majoring in Strategic Communication with minors in Spanish and American Constitutional Democracy. On-campus, she is an ambassador for the Honors College and involved with Kappa Alpha Theta and Mizzou Alternative Breaks. She also volunteers as an English tutor for Refugee and Immigration Services. After graduation, she plans to attend law school.

Allison Smythe

Allison Smythe

Staff,

Kinder Institute Programs Coordinator
Allison Smythe received her B.F.A. in Design Communication from Texas Tech University and, after beginning her design career in Boston, returned to Texas to pursue an M.F.A. in Creative Writing at the University of Houston and to launch the award-winning design firm, Ars Graphica. She relocated to Columbia in 2006, with Ars Graphica transitioning into a virtual studio servicing corporate clients across the United States in graphic design and marketing. Her poems and essays have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies, and, in 2007, she helped launch “Hearing Voices/Seeing Visions,” a monthly artist and writer series held at Orr Street Studios in downtown Columbia. In addition, she regularly volunteers her time and talents in support of community enrichment programs from the Columbia Art League to the Unbound Book Festival. Allison joins the Kinder Institute as a Program Coordinator, handling, among many other things, travel, events, marketing design, and multimedia production.

Caroline Spalding

Caroline Spalding

Staff,

Caroline Spalding received Bachelor of Arts degrees in Political Science and History from Mizzou in 2016. She is currently working toward a J.D. and Master’s in Public Administration at MU and expects to receive those in 2020. While in law school, she spent a summer abroad working for the Human Rights Commission in Cape Town, South Africa, and conducted research on rehabilitation and intervention programs at the Center for Criminal and Juvenile Justice Priorities at Mizzou, and she was also extensively involved in the American Constitution Society and the Equal Justice Law Association. Caroline has been involved with the Kinder Institute for some time: as part of the inaugural class of the Society of Fellows; as Senior Editor for Vol. 2 of the Journal on Constitutional Democracy and Deputy Editor for Vol. 5 of the Journal; and for the last four years, as the Institute’s fiscal officer.

Jonathan Sperber

Jonathan Sperber

Affiliated Faculty,

Jonathan Sperber received his Ph.D. in 1980 from the University of Chicago and has been at the University of Missouri since 1984 since 2003 as the Curators’ Professor of History. A major element of his scholarship is a focus on popular politics, democratic aspirations, and constitutional practices in nineteenth-century Europe. He has authored a number of books along those lines, including Rhineland Radicals: The Democratic Movement and the Revolution of 1848-49 (1991); The European Revolutions, 1848 – 1851 (2nd ed. 2005); The Kaiser’s Voters: Electors and Elections in Imperial Germany (1997); and Karl Marx: A Nineteenth-Century Life (2013). His current scholarly project is a book entitled, “The Age of Interconnection: A Global History of the Second Half of the Twentieth Century.” Prof. Sperber regularly teaches classes on nineteenth-century European history and on German history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Peverill Squire

Peverill Squire

Affiliated Faculty,

Peverill Squire is Professor of Political Science and holds the Hicks and Martha Griffiths Chair in American Political Institutions. He received his A.B., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California-Berkeley. In recent years he has authored The Rise of the Representative: Lawmakers and Constituents in Colonial America (2017) and The Evolution of American Legislatures: Colonies, Territories and States, 1619-2009 (2012); co-authored Why States Matter (second edition, 2017); State Legislatures Today: Politics under the Domes (second edition, 2015); 101 Chambers: Congress, State Legislatures, and the Future of Legislative Studies (2005); and Who Runs for the Legislature? (2001); and co-edited Legislatures: Comparative Perspectives on Representative Assemblies (2002). Professor Squire’s research centers on American politics with an emphasis on legislatures, and for many years, he served as the senior editor of Legislative Studies Quarterly. He regularly teaches undergraduate courses on American state government and American legislatures and graduate courses on legislative institutions, the evolution of American legislatures, and American state politics.

Austin Stafford

Austin Stafford

Undergraduate Fellows,

A former resident of Kansas City, Austin Stafford is a sophomore in the MU Honors College, studying history and seeking to add one of many potential double majors. Austin is also a member of the Arts and Science Student Council, involved with the Mizzou Undergraduate History Society, and participates in student recreational sports. He recently interned at the State Historical Society, working with the National History Day team, and studied abroad in Oxford during the Spring 2019 semester with Jay Sexton’s Global History class. Post-graduation, he hopes to attend law school or graduate school to further his education.

Sidney Steele

Sidney Steele

Kinder Scholars,

Born and raised in Nixa, MO, Sidney Steele is an MU Junior, studying Convergence Journalism and Political Science. Sidney is passionate about making sure you vote, and she channels this passion through her position as Vice President of the Associated Students of the University of Missouri. On campus, she is also involved with Mizzou Alternative Breaks and is a member of the Kappa Delta sorority. After finishing her undergraduate career at Mizzou, she plans to pursue graduate studies and hopes to someday work for NPR.

Mathew Swan

Mathew Swan

Undergraduate Fellows,

Raised in Hartsburg, Missouri, Mathew Swan is a junior, majoring in Political Science, Philosophy, and Classics with a minor in American Constitutional Democracy. He is chair of the University Libraries Student Advisory Council, as well as director of Tiger Pantry for the 2019-20 academic year. Mathew has also served as chair of the Missouri Students Association’s Operations Committee and as the student representative on the Open Educational Resources and Textbook Affordability Task Force. Outside of Mizzou, Mathew interned at the Missouri House of Representatives during the 2018 and 2019 sessions, and after graduating from MU, he plans on continuing his education by attending law school.

Mackenzie Tor

Mackenzie Tor

Graduate Fellows,

M.A. Fellow in Political History
Mackenzie Tor received her B.A. in History & Italian from Providence College and is currently completing her M.A. in History with Dr. Jeff Pasley. Her research interests include early American social and cultural history, and her thesis will examine segregation in the antebellum temperance movement. When not hard at work, Mackenzie enjoys reading, practicing yoga, and cheering on her favorite Boston sports teams. She joins the Kinder Institute as a Fall 2019 M.A. Fellow in History.

Dennis Trout

Dennis Trout

Affiliated Faculty,

Dennis Trout is Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Missouri. Before coming to MU in 2000, he was Associate Professor of Classics at Tufts University. He received his Ph.D. in Ancient History from Duke University in 1989. His research focuses on the period of Late Antiquity and engages material and visual evidence as well as literary sources. He has been President of the North American Patristics Society and is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Loeb Classical Library Foundation. He is the author of Paulinus of Nola: Life, Letters, and Poems (University of California Press, 1999) and Damasus of Rome: The Epigraphic Poetry (Oxford University Press, 2015). He is also interested in ancient political thought and practice, and he teaches a course on Political Thought in Classical and Christian Antiquity for the Kinder Institute’s Minor and Certificate in American Constitutional Democracy.

Sonia Tycko

Sonia Tycko

PostDoctoral Fellows,

Sonia Tycko is a historian of early modern England and its American colonies, with an emphasis on social relations, law, and labor. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2019. As a Kinder Junior Research Fellow in Atlantic History at the Rothermere American Institute and St. Peter’s College, Oxford, she is revising her dissertation into a book, tentatively entitled Captured Consent: Forced Labor and the Rise of Freedom of Contract. This project examines what consent meant and how it worked in seventeenth-century master-servant relationships that were formed under coercion. An article arising out of this research, “The Legality of Prisoner of War Labour in England, 1648–1655,” is forthcoming in Past & Present. Her research has been supported by the Mellon-ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship, the American Historical Association, the Huntington Library, the North American Conference on British Studies, the John Carter Brown Library, and the McNeil Center for Early American Studies.

Peter Vallentyne

Peter Vallentyne

Affiliated Faculty,

Peter Vallentyne is Florence G. Kline Professor of Philosophy at the University of Missouri. He writes on issues of liberty and equality in the theory of justice (and left-libertarianism in particular) and, more recently on enforcement rights (rights to protect primary rights). He was associate editor of Politics, Philosophy, and Economics and of Ethics; he was co-editor of Economics and Philosophy; and he is currently associate editor of the Journal of the American Philosophical Association and of Social Choice and Welfare. He edited Equality and Justice (2003, 6 volumes) and Contractarianism and Rational Choice: Essays on David Gauthier’s Morals by Agreement (1991), and he co-edited, with Hillel Steiner, The Origins of Left Libertarianism: An Anthology of Historical Writings and Left Libertarianism and Its Critics: The Contemporary Debate (2000). He has held an American Council of Learned Societies fellowship and directed a National Endowments for the Humanities project on ethics across the curriculum. He can be contacted at Vallentynep@missouri.edu.

Constantine Vassiliou

Constantine Vassiliou

PostDoctoral Fellows,

Kinder Institute Postdoctoral Fellow in Political Thought & Constitutionalism
Constantine Vassiliou earned his B.A. in Political Science from Mount Allison University, and both his M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Theory from the University of Toronto. His research points to a perennial problem in political economy that continues to the present-day unresolved: how to balance commercial considerations with the public interest? He considers this question through the lenses of Enlightenment-era political philosophers who met similar challenges during capitalism’s nascent stages. His dissertation considered Montesquieu’s conception of political moderation in the context of John Law’s economic system in early eighteenth-century France. His current project examines how the politics of the South Sea ‘Bubble’ in England [1720] informed early debates in American political economy, with a view towards gaining a deeper understanding of how financial crisis impacts citizens’ trust in public institutions. Constantine was recently awarded a Visiting Research Fellowship at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. He joins the Kinder Institute as a Postdoctoral Fellow in Political Thought & Constitutionalism.

 

Steven Watts

Steven Watts

Affiliated Faculty,

Steven Watts is Professor of History at the University of Missouri, where he has won the Kemper Teaching Award and the system-wide Thomas Jefferson Award and served two terms as Chair of the Department of History. He has published six books, including biographies of Walt Disney, Henry Ford, Hugh Hefner, and Dale Carnegie, and, most recently, John F. Kennedy. His books have been widely reviewed in prominent newspapers and magazines, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, New York Review of Books, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, Washington Post, The New Republic, The Atlantic, The Economist, The Nation, Commentary, and National Review, and they have been issued in many foreign editions, including Chinese, Russian, Arabic, Spanish, German, and Korean. Professor Watts has appeared on NPR, PBS, C-SPAN, NBC, CBS, MSNBC, CNBC, Fox, Bloomberg News, Telemundo, BBC, the History Channel, and dozens of radio stations around the United States and Europe. Most recently, he has been involved with two PBS “American Experience” documentary films on Henry Ford and Walt Disney. He has delivered invited lectures at the University of California at Berkeley, Duke University, University of London, University of Paris, Wake Forest, University of Minnesota, Washington University in St. Louis, and many others.

Christina E. Wells

Christina E. Wells

Affiliated Faculty,

Christina E. Wells is the Enoch H. Crowder Professor of Law at the University of Missouri School of Law. Professor Wells received her BA cum laude from the University of Kansas and her JD cum laude from the University of Chicago School of Law, where she was Comment Editor of the Law Review. After graduating from law school, Professor Wells worked in private practice at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom in Chicago and Heller, Ehrman, White & McAullife in Los Angeles before joining the University of Missouri faculty in 1993. Professor Wells teaches Freedom of Speech, Administrative Law, Remedies, and Lawyering at MU, and she has served as a visiting professor and Fulbright Scholar in the Czech Republic at Masaryk and Palacky Universities and a visiting professor at the University of Illinois College of Law. She is a recipient of the Husch Blackwell Sanders Distinguished Faculty Award for excellence in teaching and the Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Excellence in Research

John Wigger

John Wigger

Affiliated Faculty,

John Wigger is a Professor in the MU Department of History. He earned a B.S. in Petroleum Engineering from West Virginia University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in History from the University of Notre Dame, where he studied cultural-religious history in the United States. He has broad interests in the interconnections between Christianity and democracy in American history and serves as President of the Conference on Faith and History. Professor Wigger’s publications include Taking Heaven by Storm: Methodism and the Rise of Popular Christianity in America, 1770-1820 (1998), Methodism and the Shaping of American Culture, co-edited with Nathan Hatch (2001), American Saint: Francis Asbury and the Methodists (2009), and most recently, PTL: The Rise and Fall of Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker’s Evangelical Empire, published by Oxford University Press in August 2017. He regularly teaches courses on the social and cultural history of the United States.

Lauren Wilcox

Lauren Wilcox

Kinder Scholars,

Orange County, CA-local Lauren Wilcox is a Sophomore at the University of Missouri, majoring in Strategic Communication, with a primary focus on art direction, and minoring in Business. She is a member of the MU Honors College and the online media director for the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. Her hobbies include reading nonfiction, baking, and enjoying a good game of football, and she plans to pursue a design career in the magazine industry after completing her time as a Mizzou undergrad.

Cate Wilkins

Cate Wilkins

Undergraduate Fellows,

Cate Wilkins is a senior from O’Fallon, MO, majoring in Political Science with minors in Criminal Justice and Leadership and Public Service. She is a team captain for the Mizzou Mock Trial Association, an ambassador for the Honors College, and a proud member of the trumpet section in Marching Mizzou. As a Show-Me Scholar and Discovery Fellow, she researches different facets of the Cyprus Issue with Dr. J.D. Bowers, Director of the Honors College. Cate has previously completed two internships, one doing intake and drafting charges of discrimination at the Missouri Commission on Human Rights and one at the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri, where she created free, educational workshops for the public. She enjoys volunteering with STRIPES, Rainbow House, and Mizzou Alternative Breaks, and upon graduation, she plans to go to law school and work in criminal justice reform.

Erica Winston

Erica Winston

Undergraduate Fellows,

Erica Winston, a Detroit native and Kansas City resident, is a senior at the University of Missouri, majoring in History and minoring in Political Science. Erica actively engages in social justice and is passionate about human rights. In her time at Mizzou, she has served as an MSA Senator and worked with It’s On Us and as a company actress in MU’s Interactive Theatre Troupe, and she currently is a Residential Advisor. Erica believes in the power of art and its ability to transform our views of ourselves, and she hopes to use art to strengthen our world by promoting diversity, convening dilemmas in choice, and helping us critically analyze the impact that systemic oppression has on marginalized citizens. Her scholarly interests include the spiritual roots of natural law, philosophy, and how culture informs conscience. In her spare time, Erica enjoys photography, music, and film.

Sawyer Young

Sawyer Young

Graduate Fellows,

Kinder Institute M.A. Fellow in Political History
Sawyer Young received his B.A. in 2018 from Westminster College in his hometown of Fulton, MO, and is currently an M.A. candidate in History at MU, working under Jeff Pasley. His work focuses on the history of American Indian social movements, citizenship, and civil rights, and he has a particular scholarly interest in the intersection between native cultural, political, and artistic expressions in the late-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He joins the Kinder Institute as a Spring 2020 M.A. Fellow in Political History.